From October 21-24, 2017, Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL) Canada members will be in Ottawa lobbying their MPs and Senators. We will present 5 simple steps to improve Canada’s carbon pricing policy. Below2°C‘s Ken Johnson and Rolly Montpellier will be among the lobbyists.

CCL Canada lobbying on Parliament Hill

Since September 2010, Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL) Canada members have been lobbying their federal parliamentarians for carbon fee and dividend: a national, upstream, and incrementally rising carbon price where 100 percent of the money is returned to citizens on an equitable basis.

Related article – Why I Lobby Members of Parliament

We applaud the Canadian government for announcing a national price on carbon, uniting all provinces and territories with a minimum and rising fee. This is an important step to help Canada in its transition to a clean energy economy. In the Pan-Canadian Clean Growth and Climate Plan, the government recognizes that this transition will result in a strong, diverse and competitive economy.

Meeting Paris Agreement Targets

However, the Federal government has committed to increasing the fee for only five years.  Not knowing if the fee will continue to rise beyond 2022 makes planning difficult for Canadian businesses that want to take a longer view.  Also a five year commitment is not enough to meet Canada’s goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. We call on the Canadian government to extend the rising fee to year 2030.

Five Simple Steps Needed On Carbon Pricing - CCL Canada, below2c

The figure shows that Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions projections under a “with current measures” scenario are projected to be 768 megatonnes (Mt) CO2 eq in 2020 and 815 Mt CO2 eq in 2030. It also shows the expected range of the same projections under different economic and energy price and production scenarios. For 2020, the expected range of emissions could be between 749 Mt and 790 Mt. For 2030, the expected range of emissions could be between 765 Mt and 875 Mt. The figure also shows Canada’s 2020 greenhouse gas emissions target (622 Mt)  and Canada’s 2030 target (524 Mt).

In addition, there must be clarity from the federal government on the comprehensiveness of the national carbon price plan. Excluding some sectors from a carbon fee unfairly burdens other industries and undermines Canada’s climate commitments.  A comprehensive fee applied at the wellhead and point of entry for import in all provinces will most effectively reduce Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions while providing powerful incentives to invest in the clean energy economy.

Canada can significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions by becoming a world leader in the clean energy economy.  Extending the rising fee to 2030, ensuring comprehensive coverage, and imposing border tax adjustments will help ensure a strong, diverse and competitive economy inspiring other countries to take Canada’s lead.

Improving Canada’s Carbon Pricing in Five Simple Steps 

  1. That the carbon fee is applied upstream: at the wellhead, coal mine or point of entry into the economy.
  2. That the national carbon price continues to rise past 2022 with the objective of Canada exceeding our Paris targets and becoming a world leader in tackling the climate crisis and in the clean tech industry.
  3. That border tax adjustments are included in the policy to level the playing field for domestic industries with international jurisdictions without a similar carbon price.
  4. That the federal government work with the provinces and territories to ensure provincial carbon pricing systems can keep up with the rising federal minimum carbon price without imposing any additional burdens on low and middle-income Canadians. For example, the federal government could propose carbon fee and dividend as a model policy.
  5. To ensure that there is a consistent policy towards combating climate change, that the federal government, as promised in the 2015 Liberal election platform, end financial subsidies to fossil fuel companies.

Extending the rising carbon fee to 2030, providing comprehensive coverage, and imposing border tax adjustments will help ensure a strong, diverse and competitive economy inspiring other countries to take Canada’s lead.  The future will be Canada’s when we enact an effective carbon pricing policy. Our volunteers want to help Canada win the race to the top. ~ Cathy Orlando, National Director, CCL Canada.

Source: CCL Canada “Leave-Behind” document.

Register for our National Conference and Lobbying Days October 21-24, 2017

4 COMMENTS

  1. Not sure I would agree with point 3. It doesn’t matter where the carbon enters the atmosphere, domestically or internationally. Additionally for imports of similar materials from jurisdictions without such measures there should be a similar imposed tax on point of entry into the Canadian energy sector.

    • This is Point 3 you refer to Max.

      “That border tax adjustments are included in the policy to level the playing field for domestic industries with international jurisdictions without a similar carbon price.”

      The purpose of a border tax is to do exactly what you suggest, impose a tax on point of entry.

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